Printing techniques

Screenprints

The artist creates a stencil, which is transferred directly to a screen using a light sensitive resist. The stencil can take the form of a cut out, a painted effect or a photograph. Once transferred, ink is forced through the stencil using a rubber blade to transfer or print the image. The artist may require more than one stencil to create an image. These additional stencils can be subsequently printed to build a more complex and multi-coloured work.

 

The artist creates a stencil, which is transferred directly to a screen using a light sensitive resist. The stencil can take the form of a cut out, a painted effect or a photograph. Once transferred, ink is forced through the stencil using a rubber blade to transfer or print the image. The artist may require more than one stencil to create an image. These additional stencils can be subsequently printed to build a more complex and multi-coloured work.

 

Archival pigment prints

Archival paper and state-of-the-art inkjet printing combine to reproduce existing artwork impeccably. Archival Pigment Prints at Lazinc Editions are often further treated and glossed to add texture to each print. Archival pigment prints are now the industry standard for reproduction.

 

Archival paper and state-of-the-art inkjet printing combine to reproduce existing artwork impeccably. Archival Pigment Prints at Lazinc Editions are often further treated and glossed to add texture to each print. Archival pigment prints are now the industry standard for reproduction.

 

Woodcuts

The artist carves their image into a wooden block that is subsequently inked with a roller, leaving ink on the surface of the block. An impression is then taken by placing paper directly over the carved and inked surface, then applying pressure either by hand or on a direct or roller driven press. Woodcut prints are sometimes described as linocuts in reference to the linoleum which sometimes replaces wood.

 

The artist carves their image into a wooden block that is subsequently inked with a roller, leaving ink on the surface of the block. An impression is then taken by placing paper directly over the carved and inked surface, then applying pressure either by hand or on a direct or roller driven press. Woodcut prints are sometimes described as linocuts in reference to the linoleum which sometimes replaces wood.

 

Photopolymer gravures

An autographic or photographic image is transferred onto an aluminium plate coated in a photosensitive polymer emulsion. The resulting plate is later printed in the usual intaglio method. Multiple plates can be printed together to build a full colour print if the artist desires.

An autographic or photographic image is transferred onto an aluminium plate coated in a photosensitive polymer emulsion. The resulting plate is later printed in the usual intaglio method. Multiple plates can be printed together to build a full colour print if the artist desires.

Etchings

Traditional etchings require the artist to draw an image onto a treated copper plate using a variety of hand tools. The plate is then etched in acid and subsequently printed on a traditional etching press. Etching is a generalised term for the basic principle of the process: this is often expanded into various specific forms dependant on the technical execution, including: dry point, spit-bite, sugar-lift, hard ground and soft ground etchings.

 

Traditional etchings require the artist to draw an image onto a treated copper plate using a variety of hand tools. The plate is then etched in acid and subsequently printed on a traditional etching press. Etching is a generalised term for the basic principle of the process: this is often expanded into various specific forms dependant on the technical execution, including: dry point, spit-bite, sugar-lift, hard ground and soft ground etchings.

 

Monotype prints

The artist draws or paints directly on to a sheet of metal, glass or Perspex, which is then pressed in order to transfer a direct impression. The initial transfer or printing process can remove up to 90% of the ink meaning only one true print can be taken. Any subsequent prints are referred to as "Ghosts". Artists often hand paint further on top of their monotypes.

 

The artist draws or paints directly on to a sheet of metal, glass or Perspex, which is then pressed in order to transfer a direct impression. The initial transfer or printing process can remove up to 90% of the ink meaning only one true print can be taken. Any subsequent prints are referred to as "Ghosts". Artists often hand paint further on top of their monotypes.

 

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    Lazinc Sackville

    info@lazinc.com
    +44 (0) 207 636 5443

    Gallery: Tuesday-Saturday 10am-6pm

    Office: Monday–Friday 10am–6pm

    Admission is free

    For wheelchair access, please contact the gallery prior to your visit.

     

    Lazinc Sackville

    +44 (0) 207 636 5443
    info@lazinc.com

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